Summer 2017 Session II Module List

 

Art of Game Design

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Instructor:

Mr. Matt Boardman

Want to make something Unreal? This summer course is an introduction to creating interactive worlds for video games. Students will learn current and professional skills and techniques to create environments using the Unreal Engine. No previous art or computer experience is necessary. This introduction makes use of basic techniques that will teach you how to be creative using game industry standard methodologies that are introduced in a way that is easy to understand. Students will learn basic 2-D concept art, 3-D modeling, texturing, and level design. Then students will translate those skills into creating a game level of their own. So, if you are curious about the art of video games, then level up your skills, creativity, and talent with this introduction!

 

Free Trade/Fair Trade:

Understanding World Trade from the Local to the Global

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Understanding World Trade from the Local to the Global

Instructor:

Dr. Jonathan Otto

Ever wonder who picked the coffee beans in your macchiato latte from Starbucks? Or who sewed the jeans you bought from Gap? Or stitched the soles onto your Nike Air Max 90s? Or what those workers were paid?

This seminar foregrounds the intellectual, economic, and political debate between “free trade” and “fair trade” with a focus on the post-WWII historical emergence of world trade, exchange, and banking systems.

We will also examine the late 20th and early 21st century forging of U.S. international trade agreements (NAFTA, CAFTA, FTAA, and TPP).

Throughout, we will explore key questions through historic, economic, political, sociological, and cultural lenses. For example: What is free trade? What is fair trade? Is free trade fair? Is fair trade free?

 

Jumping Into Kinesiology: 

Evaluating Movement and its Benefits to Overall Health

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Evaluating Movement and its Benefits to Overall Health

Instructor:

Eric Slattery

This module will focus on how exercise is beneficial for health. Exercise is used in a therapeutic way by many health and fitness professionals around the world. This module will focus on how those professionals evaluate health and then decide what therapeutic treatments they will administer to improve client health. We will cover how health is defined, risk factors of health, what measures health professionals use to quantify/assess health, and steps that they can take to improve their physical health. These areas will largely include cardiorespiratory health and muscular health. Many of these assessments measure the same thing, particularly cardiorespiratory health, and students will learn about advantages and disadvantages of each test. Lab activities will include Blood Lipid Profile (Glucose, TC, LDL, HDL), body composition (height, weight, body fat, body water), electrocardiogram of the heart, functional movement screening, resistance exercise assessment, and graded exercise testing.

 

Engineering Design:

Build an Interactive Robot

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Build an Interactive Robot

Instructor:

Dr. Jim Leonard

It's science. Not fiction. This summer, delve headfirst into the realms of engineering and computing by designing and building a computer-controlled robot. First, you'll learn how they communicate. Through the wires and steel runs a rich programming language that reads light sensors and controls drive motors. Next, you and your team will apply those concepts to the design of your own robotic vehicle. Your team will assemble it. Program it. Test it. Then, your robot will face off in performing its task against the other teams' creations. The winner will be crowned. The universe might be saved by building a computer-controlled robot.

 

Measuring the Mind:

Psychology and Psychophysiology in Action

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Psychology and Psychophysiology in Action

Instructor:

Dr. April Smith

Why do people think what they think? When does that thinking become problematic, or even disordered? How do we measure what people are thinking? Does people’s thinking affect the way they feel?

In this Summer Scholars module, students will discover the answers to these and other questions by learning the fundamentals of psychology and psychophysiology (the way the mind and body interact). There will be a special emphasis on how to measure psychological processes. This program will encourage hands on learning, and students will be taught how to measure implicit (or automatic) cognition using computer based reaction time tests, emotion via self-report surveys, and arousal by learning how to collect heart rate and electrodermal responses. This learning will be cemented when students design and conduct their very own psychological experiment.

 

Miami Art Portfolio Studio

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Instructor:

Mr. Matthew Litteken

The Miami Art Portfolio Summer Studio (MAPS) is a summer art workshop organized by the Department of Art for high school students who are interested in improving their creative skills to produce a competitive art portfolio for college admission. During the first week, students will focus on the visual language of drawing. Emphasis is placed on learning to see by stressing intense looking, critical judgment, and precise measuring through direct observation. Students will build their seeing and rendering skills through exercises dealing with line, form, value, and formal composition. Each class includes hands-on projects that heighten students' ability to accurately create the illusion of three-dimensional forms in space on a two-dimensional picture plane, while simultaneously investigating diverse subject matter and a variety of drawing mediums.

The second week is designed to familiarize students with spatial design and construction. Students will concentrate on design elements and principles, compositional techniques, drafting practices, and craftsmanship. Students will create elementary and advanced sculptures using a variety of tools, materials, and methods. Studio sessions will consist of slide presentations, demonstrations, hands-on activities, and critiques. These activities are devised to give students an introduction to collegiate studies and to build advanced portfolios. The module will conclude with portfolio documentation and analysis to improve application quality as well as an exhibition of works created.

 

Search for the Cure:

The Discovery of Novel Antibiotics

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The Discovery of Novel Antibiotics

Instructor:

Dr. Michael Kennedy

Have you ever searched for novel antibiotics from local plants and mushrooms? We’ll go into the field and collect our own samples and then prepare extracts and screen for antibiotic activity. When we find a "hit," we will use molecular methods to identify the plant or mushroom species and perform liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry experiments and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments to isolate and characterize the active compounds.

 

Inside State and Local Government:

Leadership and Public Affairs

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Leadership and Public Affairs

Instructor:

Dr. Mark Morris

Students interested in taking a leadership role in public affairs will focus on how public policy made in Washington, D.C. shapes the public agenda for state and local governments across the United States. From the sobering imperative of homeland security to the fascinating patchwork of interstate highways, streets, and roads, we’ll discover intricacies of the politics and economics inside state and local government.

Check out former projects.

 

Media Matters:

Journalism in Action

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Journalism in Action

Instructor:

Patricia Gallagher Newberry

What does it take to make it as a journalist in the fast-paced, multimedia news industry today? Find out from journalists working at the front lines in southwest Ohio and around the country, as you create your own content about other Summer Scholars and learn about the many opportunities Miami offers to prepare you to produce 21st century journalism.

 

The Physics of Magnetism

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Instructors:

Dr. Mahmud Khan

Have you ever pondered what causes the northern (or polar) lights? Or, how a bullet train moves as fast as 500 km/h? The answers to these and many other similar questions lies in ‘magnetism’ that can only be explained by quantum physics. Although, the phenomenon is apparently invisible, our day-to-day life depends on magnetism in many different ways. In fact, the earth itself is a giant magnet whose magnetic field protects us from the strong radiation emitted by the sun. In general, magnetism is the key to enormous amount of technological advancements. It is almost impossible to total up the enormity of applications whose functionality is strictly dependent on magnetic properties of materials.

This module will explore the core concepts of classical physics and the basics of quantum mechanics, particularly the concepts of magnetism. The topics will be discussed via detailed examples and hands on demonstrations including the visualization of the magnetic field lines, designing simple electro magnets and motors, jump rope generator, and magnetic levitation of superconductors.

 

Lost Cities and Civilizations:

Archaeology and the Ancient World

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Archaeology and the Ancient World

Instructor:

Dr. Jeb Card

We'll discover the subtle clues and sensational treasures of ancient peoples from the earliest depths of prehistory to the great empires of Egypt and the Inka. We will learn how humans colonized the world, adapted to changing environments, transformed the landscape, and built new technologies and social orders to face daunting challenges. In the process we’ll analyze real artifacts, participate in the 3-D scanning and printing of artifacts, try our hand at how archaeologists excavate a site, decipher ancient hieroglyphs, figure out how old ancient Egyptian tombs are, and explore the role of archaeology today.

 

The Entrepreneurship Experience:

Building Your Dreams and Passions into Fun and Profitable Ventures

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Building Your Dreams and Passions into Fun and Profitable Ventures

Instructors:

Dr. Jim Friedman

David Eyman

The secret to success in life and business can be found in the entrepreneurial mindset. The entrepreneurship track of the Summer Scholars Program exposes students to the fun and excitement of bringing ideas to life. Students will participate in interactive, hands-on projects where they will be exposed to what it takes to build companies, teams, and insight. Whatever your interests – building a small start-up company, creating a major corporation, driving meaningful social change, or working in creative fields – we will build ideas, form teams, and create the structure that builds success.

 

Taking Care of Business

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Instructors:

Dr. Jeff Merhout
Ms. Helen Koons
Ms. Brenda Homan

What do people “do” in business? What makes a business successful? What does it take to be a business professional? The “Basics of Business” track of the Summer Scholars Program will allow students to investigate all of the functional areas of business, better understand business processes, and develop basic competency in the language of business. Students will work in competitive teams to solve a real-world business problem while thinking creatively and working collaboratively. Students will also have an opportunity to practice how to present in a professional environment.